Dictionary
Word              
alphabetically

Definition

(what I mean when I say) 

Links or from
adjustment             
 
An attempt or method of applying a corrective force to body parts that are analysed to be in a state of subluxation. This may be done by a variety of means, not limited to manual manipulation. This may be done by the use of instruments or specialised benches. adjustment.  This term does not on its own imply a specific symptom reversal or outcome

.

see subluxation below
aetiology The cause of a disease.  
allopath
A person whose primary objective is to alleviate
symptoms. A method of treating disease with remedies that produce effects different from those caused by the disease itself. From allos "opposite" and pathos "suffering". Conventional medical practitioners are "allopaths".
 

.

http://www.thefreedictionary.co
m/allopathy
allostasis        
In a stressful state both homeostasis and allostasis are endogenous systems responsible for maintaining the internal stability of an
organism. Homeostasis, from the Greek homeo,
means “same,” while stasis means “stable;” thus, “remaining stable by staying the same.” Allostasis was coined similarly, from the Greek allo, which means “variable;” thus, “remaining
stable by being variable”.

.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allos
tasis
allostatic load            
The physiological costs of chronic exposure to
the neural or neuroendocrine stress response
 

.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allos
tatic_load
anatomy The study of normal physical structure. 

.

 
annulus The outer cartilage portion of the spinal discs. This is arranged in rings (annular) like the rings of a tree cross section. see disc below 

.

 
artery Blood vessel carrying blood away from the heart 

.

 
ATP Adenosine Tri-Phosphate

ATP is the main energy source for the majority of cellular functions. This includes the synthesis of macromolecules, including DNA, RNA, and proteins. 

.

 
bone       
Bones are rigid organs that form part of the endoskeleton of vertebrates. Bones function to move, support, and protect the body, produce red and white blood cells and store minerals. Bones come in a variety of shapes and have a
complex internal and external structure, allowing
them to be lightweight yet strong and hard, while fulfilling their many other functions. One of the types of tissues that makes up bones is the mineralized osseous tissue, also called bone tissue, that gives bones their rigidity and
honeycomb-like three-dimensional internal structure. Other types of tissue found in bones include marrow, endosteum and periosteum, nerves, blood vessels and cartilage.
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bon
e
capsular ligament a ligament surrounding and encapsulating a gliding joint to enable lubricating fluid to be contained within the space created by this capsule. It adds a small amount to joint stability. 

.

 

cartilage end-plate

 

outer 2/3 of annulus are firmly anchored into vertebral bodies.(1) Cartilage end plate contains no fibrillar connection with collagen of subchondral bone of the vertebrae. This lack of interconnection between end plate and the vertebrae may render disc bio-mechanically weak against horizontal shear forces (2) 

.

1 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/

2922637

 

2

http://www.wheelessonline.com/ortho/

cartilagenous_end_plate_of_

intervertebral_disc

cauda equina syndrome Cauda equina syndrome is a serious condition caused by compression of the nerves in the lower portion of the spinal canal below the spinal cord - L2 or lower. 

.

 
cell (biology)
The smallest metabolically functional unit of life,  

.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cell
cervical spine
The 7 spinal bones of the spine below the
occipital bone of the skull and above the thoracic vertebrae
 

.

 
coccyx
A group of 4 or 5 spinal bones below the sacral
bone
 
conjecture        
A statement or idea which is unproven, but is
thought to be true; a guess.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conj
ecture
chiropractic (purpose) The
 purpose 
of 
chiropractic
 is 
the 
alleviation 
of 
suffering
 through 
the
 functional 
enhancement
 of 
life
 through 
neuro­musculoskeletal 
integrity
. 

.

J 
Ierano DC 2010
coccyx A group of 4 or 5 spinal bones below the sacral bone, sometimes called the "tail bone".

.

 
conjecture A statement or idea which is unproven, but is thought to be true; a guess.   
connective tissue
The supporting or framework tissue of the body, formed of fibrous and ground substance with more or less numerous cells of various kinds.  The varieties of connective tissue are: areolar or loose; adipose; dense, regular or irregular,
white fibrous; elastic; mucous; lymphoid tissue;
cartilage; and bone. Blood and lymph may be regarded as connective tissues, the ground substance of which is a liquid.

synonym: interstitial   

.

http://www.emedicine.com/asp/
dictionary.asp?keyword=connec
tive+tissue
Contralateral
(Latin contra; against): on the opposite from another structure. Thus, the left arm is contralateral to the right arm, or the right leg. 

.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anat
omical_terms_of_location
disc (Intervertebral
disc)
Intervertebral discs are composed of an annulus fibrosus (multi-layered cartilage) and a nucleus pulposus (a jelly substance, weight and shock distributor also a motion pivot point). The annulus strongly joins one vertebral body to the
next. After puberty discs do not have a blood supply and as such depend on diffusion of nutrients through the bony end plates of the vertebral body. Discs serve as cushions, and are the spine's shock absorbing system. They protect the vertebral bone, the brain, and nerves. The discs also provide a means some vertebral motion: extension  flexion and rotation.
Individual disc movements are small, but taken as a whole spine, considerable motion is possible.

The health of the disc determines the health of the spine. The health of the spine can determine the health of the nervous system. The health of the nervous system determines the health of the person.

.

dis-ease
A state where in the body, in some way, is malfunctioning but has the ability to return to a state of ease, well being or health. 

.

See pathology
disease see pathology 

.

 
ease
A state of ordered health
antonym = dis-ease.
empirical Knowledge produced as a result of experimentation or observation. 

.

 
end plate The upper and lower part of the vertebral body to which the spinal discs are attached. 

.

 
enteric brain
The enteric nervous system (ENS) is a subdivision of the Peripheral Nervous System,
that
directly controls the gastrointestinal system. It is capable of autonomous
functions such as the coordination of reflexes
, although it receives considerable innervation from the autonomic nervous system and thus is often considered a part of it. Its
study is the focus of neurogastroenterology. It
has as many as one billion neurons, one hundredth of the number of neurons in the
brain, and considerably more than the number of neurons in the spinal cord. The enteric nervous system is embedded in the lining of the gastrointestinal system.

.

http://en.wikipedia.org/w
iki/Enteric_nervous_sys
tem
fascia
Is the soft tissue component of the connective tissue system that permeates the human body. It inter-penetrates and surrounds muscles, bones, organs, nerves, blood vessels and other structures. Fascia is an uninterrupted, three-dimensional web of tissue that extends from head to toe, from front to back, from
interior to exterior.
It is responsible for maintaining structural integrity; for providing support and protection; and acts as a shock absorber. Fascia has an
essential role in hemodynamic and
biochemical processes, and provides the matrix that allows for intercellular communication. Fascia functions as the body's first line of defence against pathogenic agents and infections. After injury, it is the fascia that creates an environment for tissue repair.
[1] This tissue is grossly ignored for its dynamics on the body. For more see Myofascial release
 

.

The web like tissue is
fascia that has
been teased out to
allow for better appreciation of its nature.
fibromyalgia Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic condition where people experience varying levels of fatigue, headaches, stiffness and pain in the muscles and joints throughout the body. Fibromyalgia is generally referred to as a syndrome, as it has specific signs and symptoms that occur together. 

.

 
grey matter A collection of nerve cell bodies.  

.

 
health
Health is a state of complete physical, mental, social and spiritual well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.        

.

http://www.searo.who.int/en/sect
ion898/section1441.htm
hernia
of a tissue, structure, or part of an organ through the muscular tissue or the membrane by which it is normally contained. 

.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hern
ia
homeostasis
1.  The ability or tendency of an organism or a cell to maintain internal equilibrium by adjusting its physiological processes.

2. The processes used to maintain such bodily
equilibrium.
 

.

http://medical-dictionary.thefre
edictionary.com/Homoeostasis
hyper excessive (or above) compared to expected or normal.

.

 
hypothesis  
(sciences)
A tentative conjecture explaining an observation, phenomenon, or scientific problem that can be tested by further observation,
investigation, and/or experimentation.
 

.

 
innate A built in ability or state of being        

.

see Innate alt.
Innate alt.
The intelligence we're talking about is the "knowledge" or blue print that every living entity is born with, which allows it to adapt to the environment in order to be well and survive.

.

http://www.worldchiropracticalli
ance.org/resources/greens/gree
n5.htm
integrity (ethical)
The inherent complex of attributes that determines a persons moral and ethical actions and reactions. A state of acting from a position of ones convictions. 

.

 
integrity (structural) The state of being complete and entire 

.

 
intervertebral foramen (IVF)
An opening between vertebrae through which
nerves leave the spine and extend to other parts of the body. Also called a neural foramen.
 

Fig 3-37 Gray's Anatomy 35th Ed

Intervertebral (osteo)chondrosis An abnormal condition of spinal discs, which progress often without any overt signs or symptoms. Eventually this leads to progressive deterioration of the spine  see subluxation
KST Koren Specific Technique  
kyphosis
a backward directed bend in the spine as seen from the side. Normal for the mid back region of the spine. (Concave side forward)   
law (science)
The laws of science are various established scientific laws, or physical laws as they are sometimes called, that are considered universal and invariable facts of the physical world. Laws of science may, however, be disproved if new facts or evidence arise to contradict them. A "law" differs from hypotheses, theories, postulates, principles, etc., in that a law is an analytic statement, usually with an empirically
determined constant. A theory may contain a set of laws, or a theory may be implied from an empirically determined law.

.

 
ligament
fibrous soft tissue that connects one bone to
another. Its job is to limit the degree of joint play
to a "normal" range. Ligament laxity or looseness causes joint instability.
 
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/340385/ligament
literature Previous research that is on  record   
longitudinal ligament Ligaments running down the entire length of the spine. There are two of these ligaments one at the front of the vertebral bodies and one at the back.   
lordosis
a forward directed bend in the spine as seen from the side. Normal for the neck and low back regions. (Convex side forward)   
lumbar spine
The 5 spinal bones between the sacral bone and the thoracic vertebrae. There may be 4 to 6 of these bones.   
luxation A dislocation of a joint.   
lymph

Closely connected with the blood and circulatory system, the lymphatic system is an extensive drainage system that returns water and proteins from various tissues back to the bloodstream. It is comprised of a network of ducts, called lymph vessels or lymphatics, and carries lymph, a clear, watery fluid that resembles the plasma of blood. It is also intimately associated with the immune system and the production of WBC's.

 

 
manipulate
to use force to move a stuck joint and restore
motion
 
 
microcurrent
An electrical current that measures in the order of millionths of an ampere. This is of the order of magnitude that the human body generates for its proper functioning.   
motor Nerves conveying impulses from the brain to tissues 

http://headbacktohealth.com/nerve

_functions.html

muscle (skeletal)
A contractile tissue which under nerve impulse
stimulation contracts, thus bringing the body parts to which it is attached into closer proximity.see also cardiac and smooth muscle
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mus
cle
nerve
A cellular component of the Nervous system which is capable of receiving and giving minute electric signals to other nerves and tissues. These signals are the means of communication within the body and outside the body.   
Nervous System
Controls and co-ordinates the functions of all tissues, organs and systems of the body and relates the body to its environment. Everything
you say, think see or do you achieve through the functions of the Nervous System.
 
"Anatomy of the Body";
Gray, 29th Edition. P4
nucleus pulposis the inner jelly like substance within the central portion of the vertebral discs. Its job is to distribute loading pressures of the spine and to act as a pivot point for movement.   
osteophytosis / osteophyte An outgrowth of bone usually indicative of injury or abnormal stresses on the bone where they occur.   
pain A signal to alert the person feeling it that something is going wrong as a result of activity, dis-ease or pathology   
pathology
Structural change in tissue leading to changes in function. A more serious health change than a dis-ease.  see dis-ease
pathophysiology
The intersection of two older, related disciplines: (normal) physiology and pathology. It is the study of physical processes as they deviate from normal physiology.   
periosteum
A membrane that lines the outer surface of all bones, except at the joints of long bones. It can be seen as a specialised form of fascia.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peri
osteum
piezoelectric
The ability of some materials to generate an
electric potential (charge) in response to an applied mechanical force.
 
 
posture
The intentionally or habitually assumed body position.   
reflex (activity)
A reflex action is involuntary and almost instant response (of some sort) to a stimulus.
 
retrolisthesis

A posterior (backward) movement of one vertebra on the vertebra below.

For greater detail see Retrolisthesis 

www.headbacktohealth.
com/Retrolisthesis

also

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R
etrolisthesis

physiology The study of normal function in a body.   
sacral spine
The portion of the spine below the lumbar spine and above the coccyx lying between the pelvic bones. This bone is made up of 4 to 5 segments which should be fused by the end of puberty.
 
science
Science (from the Latin scientia, 'knowledge'), in the broadest sense, refers to any systematic knowledge or practice. In a more restricted sense, science refers to a system of acquiring knowledge based on the scientific method, as
well as to the organized body of knowledge gained through such research. Science is about discovery. It is constantly being upgraded based on new discovery. Facts that are not disproven though they may have been discovered some time ago may still be valid. Valid knowledge endures.
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scie
nce
scientism

The term is often used as a pejorative to indicate the improper usage of science or scientific claims.

 

 
sclerosis a hardening and hence greater density of tissue.   
sensory Nerves conveying information impulses to the brain.  http://headbacktohealth.com/nerve_functions.html
sign
Any objective evidence of disease as seen by an examiner.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medi
cal_sign
spinal cord That part of the central nervous system that extends from the brain into the spinal canal. Branching from it are sensory and motor nerve roots.

spine
The central portion of the skeleton which houses the spinal cord. It acts to transfer  weight from upper regions of the body to the lower ones and then transfers the weight to the pelvis and hips to the feet. The non infant spine has 3 major curves. See lordosis and kyphosis on this page
spondylolisthesis A forward (anterior) slippage of a vertebral body relative to the vertebra below. This is usually considered to be accompanied with a fracture through either or both pars of the vertebra.   
spur (bone)
A point which develops as a result of either:
a)  traction of ligaments of tendons on a bone
as a result of abnormal strain.
b) piezoelectric charge. See above
 
 
subluxate
Verb. The process of forming a misalignment of
a joint (most important of which are spinal joints)
which also alters nerve function.
see subluxation
 
subluxation
A collection of events when a vertebra misaligns and gets stuck. The physical manifestations can be broadly defined as:
    a) Abnormal joint motion,
    b) Loss of position,
    c) Abnormal nerve activity,
    d) Changes in blood flow,
    e) Soft tissue damage,
     f) Progressive degeneration of the          spinal joints.
The subluxation is not a thing to be studied; rather, "being subluxated" is an abnormal quality of some physical bodily systems which may lead to loss of health and performance capabilities.
 
 
subluxation alt
The word subluxation is derived from its parts.:
    sub:    less than
    lux:     light or data or information flow
    ation:  a state of being.
Hence: A condition where there is less orderly information flow within the body less than is ideal.
 
 
symptom Any subjective evidence of disease.   
syndrome
A set of signs and symptoms that tend to occur
together and which reflect the presence of a particular disease.
 
 
technique
(of chiropractic)
A method of analysis and adjustment of subluxation. There are many Techniques
available for use in chiropractic practice.
 
 
tendon
The tough connective tissue at the ends of skeletal muscle which attaches the contractile muscle to bone.   
tensegrity The exhibited strength that results when a push (skeleton) and a pull (muscle) have a balanced relationship with each other. This makes for a strong, light and flexibly manoeuvrable body/structure.   
theory (science)
A logical structure that enables one to deduce
the possible results of every experiment that
falls within its purview.
 

thoracic spine
The 12 spinal bones compose the middle
segment of the vertebral column, between the
cervical vertebrae and the lumbar vertebrae. This portion of the spine has ribs attached to it. There may be 11 to 13 bones with ribs.
 
 
translation (physics) The position change of an object relative to its previous, usual (normal) position. Usually describes a sliding or gliding position change.   
treatment The attempt to modify or alter a malfunction. This term does not imply a specific outcome  
universal
Worldwide, widespread, general, common, collective, total, entire, complete, unanimous, all over   
vacuum phenomenon Vacuum phenomena are a reliable indicator of disc degeneration. It is a linear dark zone within the disc viewed on lateral x-rays. It indicates a tear of the fibrous portion of the cartilage.   
vein Blood vessel leading blood towards the heart.   
vertebra A segment of the spine. In humans there are 24 movable segments (7 in the cervical (neck) region, 12 in the thoracic (mid back)and 5 in the lumbar (low back)regions) as well as 5 segments fused into 1 bone, the sacrum, and 4 to 5 segments that make up the coccyx. There may be variations on the numbers such as 6 lumbar bones with only 4 sacal segments etc.   
vertebral body
The cylindrical type ofstructure at the front of a
vertebral segment which has the task of transferring weight from one segment to the disc below and hence on down the spine.
 

 WBC  White Blood Cells   
      
cauda equina syndrome
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