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Health - Naturally
Benalla, Bobinawarrah & Mornington  Victoria, Australia
Nerve functions

The Safety Pin cycle
From a very simple perspective, this is how the brain controls the body.
(Called the "Safety Pin" because it looks like a safety pin. Well it did to someone and the name
stuck. Must have been a late night or something!)

    The brain at one instant initiates a change in a tissue. It does
    this by generating an electrochemical impulse in a nerve which
    ultimately reaches the tissue cells needing to be activated.
    (Motor Nerve) The tissue responds to the stimulus and does
    whatever it is designed to do. For instance if the cells are part
    of a muscle, then they will contract. If they are part of a gland,
    they will secrete the juices of that gland, if it is the stomach, it
    will secrete acid and enzymes designed to break down food.

    This activity with in the tissues so stimulated, will activate
    sense organs embedded in the tissue and when they reach a
    threshold of excitement, will stimulate a Sensory Nerve into
    activity which will transmit an signal back to the brain which will
    tell the part of the brain receiving this information that some
    change has taken place and the amount of that change. Other
    impulses coming to the brain will also let it know how much
    breakdown there is in the food of the stomach, as well as the
    degree of motion in the stomach - how much mixing there is
    there.

    The brain then decides to do one of 2 things.
    1         There is still need for more activity in the end organ
    cells.
    In which case it sends more signals down the Motor Nerve.
    2        The job is complete.
    No more nerve impulses are generated and the end organ
    (Stomach, gland or muscle etc can resume its normal resting
    state.

Sounds simple doesn't it?

Now imagine for a bit that there are an average  of 100 billion neurons in the human brain  and
each of those connects with between 600 and 10,000 other neurons (200,000 in the
cerebellum) (1) that does a lot of our automatic co-ordination. When the nerves are busy they
can each fire off signals at a rate of a maximum is 500-600 times/second. Lets say they all fire
up at once for only 1 second only we then get:









 


now you start to get the awesome complexity you are having while having a chat over lunch
and coffee with friends for that moment of 1 second and we haven't even considered what is
happening outside the brain, in the peripheral nerves and the spinal cord. That is an awesome
amount of purposeful coordination going on
and it all has to go on without interference
for everything to function well.

For Nerves to be Healthy
Nerves need Water oxygen, glucose, a bit of protein, fats, minerals, and most importantly
stimulus from other nerves.
If a nerve receives no signals from other nerves, it dies. Not
only that but it explodes and the debris that is left over a scavenged and regrown into
another nerve with more useful connections. This is based on the very valid saying:

"If you don't use it you lose it."

The same is true if for some reason you can't use it.

Oddly enough it is one of the jobs of the chiropractor to ensure that your nerves don't
explode into oblivion due to a lack of impulses, by enabling a goodly supply of impulses

stimulate all parts of the nervous system.

 

The next thing we do is to limit the wear and tear on the joints as the subluxation process causes

a diminishing of the firing rate of nerves by up to 60%.This is why chiropractors seem to have this

love of playing with bones. It is actually not the bones we are interested in so much, but rather the

proper functioning of the nerves. It is for this reason I get you patients to exercise with cross crawls

and standing on 1 leg throwing balls. It is fun to some, a chore to others and a boring refusal to

perform to others. But think of it as you helping to keep your nerves in trim condition. Than is why

you would want to make it a family craze that spreads to your friends in the school yard and the gym.

It is not so strange.  Just watch the early morning walkers. They have their weights and their ipods

and away they go in rhythm to god knows what. The important thing is you are not alone. Ok you

can do it in the privacy of your lounge room back yard or hallway.

 

"Many of the sensory neurons of the enteric brain are mechanoreceptors, which – if activated –

trigger among other responses, important neuroendocrine changes. These include a change in

the production of serotonin – an important cortical neurotransmitter 90% of which is created in

the belly – as well as other neuropeptides, such as histamine." (3)


References
1        http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/facts.html
2        http://chiron.valdosta.edu/dbriihl/intro2aanotes.htm
3        Schleip R; "Fascial plasticity – a new neurobiological explanation", 2003

 

Links this page

Safety pin cycle

Nerve health requirements

 

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